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Barabbas

February 27, 2009

Shabbat: Ba-ruch a-ta Adonai, Eh-lo-hei-nu meh-lech ha-o-lam, a-sher na-tan la-nu To-rat eh-met, v’cha-yei o-lam na-ta b’to-chei-nu. Ba-ruch a-ta Adonai, no-tein ha-Torah.

We praise You, Eternal God, Sovereign of the universe: You have given usa Torah of truth, implanting within us eternal life. We praise You. O God, Giver of the Torah.

A wonderful video that discusses the redemptive power of Jesus Christ. It is a great video.

It was about the 6th day of November 1846, before the clerk of the court, in the district of Perkins, South Carolina. Elizabeth Sanders personally requested and made a written declaration to obtain the pension agreeable to the Act of Congress, a widow of John Sanders, of Chatham County, N.C. John Sanders served in the North Carolina regime, and the claim number was W.8702 and B. L. WT, 22054-260-55. Elizabeth Sanders, the widow of John Sanders swore before Josiah Evans and the clerk of the court at Perkins District, South Carolina – William L. Keith (W.L. Keith).

The widow was married to a prisoner of war, John Sanders. Elizabeth Ray married John Sanders in the summer of 1783 and the couple was married for sixty-three years. John and Elizabeth were married until he died in 1823. The children were parents of several children, and that will be continued because John is a fascinating character.

John Sanders was the son of William Sanders, a descendant from the line of the house of Aaron (the Aaronites, of Levi). The Sanders’ were proud descendants of Scottish heritage and impeccable warriors, which any Jacobite would be proud of and the burden, legacy and your heritage of every Sanders, to this day. He was a descendant of James I, the progenitor of the North Carolina line.

John Sanders enlisted as a private in the North Carolina regime, and did two tours of duty which were only three months. It is recommended that during war time a soldier do a tour of three months, however, today our soldiers tours are extended past a year and sometimes into 18 months and many willing sacrifice their life and make an honorable choice to return back into the military, these are the soldiers that I idealize. We are so grateful that Williams’ son stood in his father’s place. My ancestors were called to duty at the age of 46 and 51 years old, while they held down the job as planter. The Sanders had already left probably around the late 1500’s and arrived in America in 1610, Prince Georges County and 1630 in Nansemond County, Isle of Wight, Virginia USA.

John Sanders spent two three month tours in the military, a total of six months. He embraced his curse, and substituted the military in the place of his father William Sanders – 1772 Chatham County, North Carolina Militia. However, during Johns’ second tour he was taken prisoner by Colonel David Fanning, a Tory in the Royal Militia, who, with a band of outlaws, conducted a campaign of guerrilla warfare against the colonists in and around Randolph County, North Carolina, burning houses, pillaging and murdering, from 1775 to 1783. John Sanders and several other colonist soldiers were marched about a 100 miles, and was beaten bloodily also was probably inhumanely tortured and beaten but he was confined in Wilmington. http://andrewbalfour.com/Colonel%20Andrew%20Balfour/David%20Fanning’s%20Narrative.htm.
In honor of the Soldiers, there is a Facebook event, http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=63338502664.

It was about the 6th day of November 1846, before the clerk of the court, in the district of Perkins, South Carolina. Elizabeth Sanders personally requested and made a written declaration to obtain the pension agreeable to the Act of Congress, a widow of John Sanders, of Chatham County, N.C. John Sanders served in the North Carolina regime, and the claim number was W.8702 and B. L. WT, 22054-260-55. Elizabeth Sanders, the widow of John Sanders swore before Josiah Evans and the clerk of the court at Perkins District, South Carolina – William L. Keith (W.L. Keith).

The widow was married to a prisoner of war, John Sanders. Elizabeth Ray married John Sanders in the summer of 1783 and the couple was married for sixty-three years. John and Elizabeth were married until he died in 1823. The children were parents of several children, and that will be continued because John is a fascinating character.

John Sanders was the son of William Sanders, a descendant from the line of the house of Aaron (the Aaronites, of Levi). The Sanders’ were proud descendants of Scottish heritage and impeccable warriors, which any Jacobite would be proud of and the burden, legacy and your heritage of every Sanders, to this day. He was a descendant of James I, the progenitor of the North Carolina line.

John Sanders enlisted as a private in the North Carolina regime, and did two tours of duty which were only three months. It is recommended that during war time a soldier do a tour of three months, however, today our soldiers tours are extended past a year and sometimes into 18 months and many willing sacrifice their life and make an honorable choice to return back into the military, these are the soldiers that I idealize. We are so grateful that Williams’ son stood in his father’s place. My ancestors were called to duty at the age of 46 and 51 years old, while they held down the job as planter. The Sanders had already left probably around the late 1500’s and arrived in America in 1610, Prince Georges County and 1630 in Nansemond County, Isle of Wight, Virginia USA.

John Sanders spent two three month tours in the military, a total of six months. He embraced his curse, and substituted the military in the place of his father William Sanders – 1772 Chatham County, North Carolina Militia. However, during Johns’ second tour he was taken prisoner by Colonel David Fanning, a Tory in the Royal Militia, who, with a band of outlaws, conducted a campaign of guerrilla warfare against the colonists in and around Randolph County, North Carolina, burning houses, pillaging and murdering, from 1775 to 1783. John Sanders and several other colonist soldiers were marched about a 100 miles, and was beaten bloodily also was probably inhumanely tortured and beaten but he was confined in Wilmington. http://andrewbalfour.com/Colonel%20Andrew%20Balfour/David%20Fanning. In honor of the Soldiers, there is a Facebook event, http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=63338502664.

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